Sewing Project No. 2

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After I made my sewing machine pocket  organizer, I got to work on a chair organizer – a very handy item that drapes over the seat of the chair so you have pockets on both sides of the chair (from McCalls’s pattern M4274, now discontinued). But it’s made for a traditional chair with four legs. There are two ties that hold it in place to the chair back. If you have a different chair I suppose you could leave the ties off and it could still work if you use safety pins to attach it to the seat cushion. Or if you have enough things in the pockets to weight it down, it could just stay in place by itself.

As you can see, I stuck a variety of things in it – pinking scissors (a birthday present from my older sister), extra pair of fabric-cutting scissors, boxes of pins, bobbins, and so on. It’s quite handy.

Simplicity also makes a pattern (3776) for fat quarter sewing accessories that’s still in print (at least as of this writing). It doesn’t have a chair organizer but it has a project organizer and other things you can make to hold your sewing items.

Happy sewing!

 

Making Bibs

When I began sewing again in 2009, I took out a lot of sewing books from the library. One of the books I repeatedly checked out was Bend-the-Rules Sewing: The Essential Guide to a Whole New Way to Sew by Amy Karol. The book contains several easy-to-make projects, everything from bibs and book bags to pillows and purses.

Around that time, I had some baby showers to attend and Amy’s book really came in handy.  She says to use “cotton on the front and cotton flannel on the back.” I wanted to use fabric that wasn’t stereotypically “baby,” such as pastel building blocks or cutesy baby animals. So I chose bold colors or designs for the front. But I didn’t find many options for the flannel back so I went with a polka dot pastel blue. At that time I had not yet explored shopping for fabric online. I was at Joann Fabrics and limited to what was in stock.

Before sewing, I prewashed the fabric and put it through the dryer. My washing instructions to my friend Debbie were: machine wash cold, tumble dry low. Or just rinse them in the sink and let ’em dry overnight.

Once I was ready to begin, I turned to page 112 for “Simple Bib.”  I had already photocopied the pattern,which was in the back of the book, and cut it out. All I had to do was trace the shape on the flannel, put that piece on top of the cotton and then sew on the marked line.

Adorable Nate wearing the striped bib

However, I had been sewing other things that month and I was on automatic pilot: cut out pattern, pin to fabric, cut fabric. So I traced out the bib on the fabric and cut along the line. Whoops, that was a mistake. If I had read all four sentences of Step 1, I would have realized that I was supposed to sew on the marked line BEFORE I cut out the shape of the bib. Then you cut the fabric 1/8″ from the seam.

So I had to start over again or the bib would have been the wrong size. Sewing along the marked outline makes for easier sewing because you can easily guide the fabric along the bib curves. Luckily, I had extra fabric and I hadn’t cut out any of the other bibs so it wasn’t a big deal.

The bibs close with snaps, which make it harder for babies to take off. Snaps are surprisingly easy to attach, just have the snap tool and a hammer handy to pound the two pieces together. (Here’s a nice description “Attaching Snaps” on the Make It and Love It blog.) I don’t recommend using velcro because you can be sure the little one will remove the bib.

Here are photos of Nate (what a cutie!) wearing the bibs and photos of the bibs before I put the snaps on. He’s now three years old and Debbie gave birth to another son earlier this year and now he’s wearing them. She tells me that she likes to use them flannel side up because food sticks to it.

Amy Karol calls it “the best bib ever” – and she’s right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nate wearing the strawberries bib

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nate really liked this bib.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Man Behind Elmo

I’m cross-posting my Tumblr review of Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey here because the film is about a man who began sewing puppets as a young boy in Baltimore, Maryland. It’s a truly inspiring tale story. The perfect film for the holidays. If you want a feel-good movie, this is it!

Elmo and Kevin Clash in BEING ELMO, a Submarine Deluxe release Photo courtesy of Scott McDermott

Elmo is the adorable red furry Muppet that kids love to hug. Remember the Tickle Me Elmo doll? Well, that infectious giggle and little kid voice comes from Kevin Clash, a tall black man from Baltimore. Yep, a black man is the voice of Elmo. And the Constance Marks’s documentary Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey focuses on his fascinating story, which is now playing in Bay Area theaters and elsewhere.

As a kid growing up in Baltimore, Clash was glued to PBS’s Sesame Street and was mesmerized by the Muppets. He soon learned to keep an eye out for any TV specials by Jim Henson, the Muppets’ creator. Then one day he made his own puppet – out of his father’s trench coat. But he didn’t get in trouble for cutting up his father’s coat without permission. He was fortunate to have loving parents who recognized and nurtured his precocious talent and let him continue to sew puppets.

Kevin Clash (1975) from BEING ELMO, a Submarine Deluxe release Photo courtesy of Kevin Clash

Fortunately, there’s plenty of footage and documentation of Clash’s early interest in puppets. He sewed many puppets as a boy and held puppets shows for the neighborhood kids. And unlike most kids, he didn’t grow out of his boyhood obsession. Instead he stuck with it through high school even when he was became known as the boy who played with dolls. As a teenager, he was invited to audition as a puppeteer for a local TV children’s program – and the film shows his audition tape. By this time in his nascent career, Clash has sewed about 85 puppets. Later on a school field trip to New York, he had the chance to tour the Muppet studio and see where the puppets were built. Through luck, talent, and persistence, he eventually got the chance to work for his idol Jim Henson. And the rest is history.

Being Elmo traces Clash’s remarkable career trajectory, from meeting Muppet builder and his eventual mentor Kermit Love, to working for Sesame Street and then creating the voice and character of the beloved puppet known today as Elmo.

It’s not just a film for Muppet and Elmo fans but an inspiring story for kids and adults alike. After all, how many people ever get to make their childhood dreams come true?

 – Chuleenan Svetvilas

How I Began Sewing Again

A few years ago I mentioned to my mom that it would be fun to sew again. Most of the sewing I’d done since college was by hand – reattaching buttons, repairing seams, and darning socks. I hadn’t done any serious sewing on a machine since college.

My Kenmore sewing machine and pocket organizer

My mom was the one who taught me to sew on her Singer Golden Touch years ago when I was in grade school. And she made most of our clothes when my three sisters and I (yep, no brothers) were growing up. Mom didn’t always read the directions of the sewing patterns, partly because English is her second language, but she used the pictures in the directions as her main guide. Looking back on that now, I think it’s pretty amazing that she was able to make so many clothes that way. Go Mom!

In 2009 I got a sewing machine from my parents for Christmas, nothing fancy – a Kenmore machine from Sears. So I was excited to make something and thought I’d start with a small project. I went to my local Joann Fabrics and looked at the pattern books and saw a McCall’s pattern for sewing organizers (M4274, now out of print but you may be able to find it on eBay). All you needed were some fat quarters, interfacing, and thread. I hadn’t done any quilting before so fat quarters were new to me. Joann’s had plenty to choose from. I decided to go with a violet theme as you can see from the photo (at left).

I figured it’d be good practice sewing straight seams. Plus I’d get to organize my growing collection of sewing things. Whenever there was a notions sale, I was snapping up pins, needles, snaps, tailor’s chalk, you name it.

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The first thing I made was the pocket organizer that my sewing machine sits on. I made it with two fat quarters and some bias tape, which perfectly matched the solid violet fabric I chose.

Now I have a place to stash at least two pairs of scissors – my fabric cutters and my small thread-snipping one. And I could stick my various marking pens and sewing machine needles in there too. I was ready to go!