International Anna Party!

Hi,

How’s your summer sewing going? I hope you’re making progress on your projects whatever they may be. I started my third By Hand London Anna Dress earlier this month – inspired by the Instagram International Anna Party invitation from Elle of @LauraLovesPugs, who’s paryting with Ute of @uta_ig and Pips of @magdalenamuse and invited everyone to join them in a celebration of this dress by post their dresses  on Instagram on on July 17 and 18. You could make a new one or post a previously made version. Use the hashtag #internationalannaparty to see the wide array of Annas.

Cheers to Elle, Ute and Pips for hosting the party! Here’s my finished dress. I’m really happy with this color-blocked version. The fabric is from Stonemountain & Daughter Fabrics in Berkeley. The bodice is Radiance by Robert Kauffman (a shiny cotton/silk sateen but I put the matte or “wrong” side facing out) and the skirt is an Alexander Henry cotton lawn.

International Anna Party - Anna Dress - By Hand London - csews.com

I think this pattern has been so popular because it works well with so any fabrics – prints of all kinds, solid colors, cottons and silks. But if you do use a print with a larger scale graphic, pay attention to the repeat when you place your skirt pattern pieces. If I had paid closer attention, I would have made sure that the larger “flower” images didn’t line up anywhere. On two of the front panels, one of the lighter flowers lines up near the waist, which happened by accident.

International Anna Party - Anna Dress - By Hand London - color blocked version - csews.com

My second Anna Dress was also color blocked – the bodice was solid red and the skirt was solid red and a print. You can see it on this post: My Red Anna Dress. For my first Anna Dress, I used a geometric border print. I made it for Sewing Indie Month in 2014. You can see that version on this post: The Anna Dress. And you’ll find photos of my fitting adjustments in that post – an SBA (small bust adjustment). For this violet version, I made one small adjustment to th back neckline, which gaped slightly in my earlier versions.

International Anna Party - Anna Dress - By Hand London - color blocked version - csews.com

This is a very figure-flattering pattern. It makes me look more slender than I really am. 😉 And what’s also nice is that it has plenty of ease in the hips. I didn’t have to grade a size up like I usually do.

International Anna Party - Anna Dress - By Hand London - color blocked version - csews.com

One thing I forgot when I was cutting this out is that I needed to cut the side front skirt panels slightly smaller. When I made my 1/2 SBA, that affected the bodice waist. So I just eased the skirt to the bodice to make it fit.

International Anna Party - Anna Dress - By Hand London - color blocked version - csews.com

I’m drinking lemonade because I took these photos in the morning. Heheh.

Thanks so much for the party! Happy sewing to all!

 

 

 

 

Update on My Anna Dress

By Hand London - Anna Dress - front view - csews.com

I’m thrilled to announce that my Anna Dress made the short list for the Dressed to the Nines contest! I made this dress as a participant of Sewing Indie Month, which was created and organized by Mari of Seamster Patterns.

Sewing Indie Month

The Dressed to the Nine category is hosted by Laura Mae of the lovely blog Lilacs & Lace. She makes so many beautiful things and documents them so nicely on her blog. You can vote for your favorite entry on her blog here. (Hint: My dress is the last one listed on this page. It’s the same name as my blog post  “The Anna Dress – Celebrating Sewing Indie Month!“)

Dressed to the Nines - Sewing Indie Month

If you want to read about some of the nitty gritty construction details and my small bust adjustment, check out my post on the Anna Dress. It was hot in the Bay Area on Monday so I wore my Anna Dress to work! And I stopped by Britex Fabrics during my lunch break to show off the dress to the folks who work there. I only work a few block from the store so they’ve seen me come and go quite often some months, picking up a zipper here, some thread there or scoping our some of the luscious fabrics on the first floor or the huge array of cottons on the second floor – not to mention sifting through remnants on the fourth floor.

Chuleenan wearing her Anna Dress at Britex Fabrics - fabric from Britex
Me at Britex Fabrics!

They really liked my dress and their marketing maven Geana even took a couple of photos of the dress and put them in a blog post entitled Sewing Indie Month: Voting Time!  It’s been a great experience working in this dress and getting such a great response! Thanks to everyone for all the kind words!

NOTE: I thought I had updated my initial Anna post on Monday but apparently I never hit update so the voting info wasn’t in that post (darn it!). So my apologies to folks who visited and didn’t know where to vote. Once again, please go to Lilacs & Lace post “Vote for the Winner of the Dressed to the Nines Sew-along.”

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The Anna Dress – Celebrating Sewing Indie Month!

 

By Hand London Anna Dress - border print fabric

Wooooheeee! I finished the Anna Dress late last night – or should I say early this morning? Yes, it really was down to the wire. This is my entry for Dressed to the Nines. My husband thought I was a crazy person because I was still sewing at 3 am. I told him, I’m trying to finish this dress for Sewing Indie Month!

I never stay up that late on a work night but I made an exception because I really wanted to complete something to celebrate Sewing Indie Month. Mari of Seamster Patterns did such an amazing job creating and organizing this month-long online sewing party, I just had to buckle down and get it done – though it took me a while to get there!

****UPDATE! My dress made the short list for the Dressed to the Nines category of Sewing Indie Month! You can vote here for my dress at Lilacs & Lace blog, until Friday, June 13.

I completely forgot about mentioning the fact that Laura Mae of great blog Lilacs & Lace is hosting the Dressed to the Nines category of Sewing Indie Month. (Forgive me but I’ve been a bit sleep deprived from making this dress!) She has great tutorials and a lot more on her blog, which features sewn and knitted vintage and vintage-inspired garments. 

You have until Friday, June 13 to cast your vote!!*******

I initially wanted to make the lovely Beatrice Dress by Sew Chic Patterns. In early May I visited all the websites of the participating designers and bought this pattern and the Anna Dress from By Hand London. The Beatrice Dress paper pattern arrived the week of May 5. Fast delivery!

Sew Chic Beatrice Dress

I love the pockets on it and the beautiful neckline. After I traced the pattern and made a muslin of the bodice, I knew I would need to do a small bust adjustment.

Sew Chic Patterns - Beatrice bodice

However, I couldn’t quite figure out how to do it because the bodice only has a waist dart, no side dart. I placed the Beatrice front bodice piece  next to my Emery Dress pattern bodice piece and could see that I needed to come in a little bit but how to do that?

Beatrice Dress front bodice pattern piece - csews.com

I’ve only done an SBA on a bodice with a side bust dart and a waist dart (the Emery Dress sewing pattern by Christine Hayes, also a Sewing Indie designer participant! You can see my Emery Dress here.) I followed the SBA instructions provided with the Emery Dress sewalong.

I posted photos on my Instagram account (@csews) and got advice from many helpful folks along the way. Brooke of Custom Style suggested that I add a side dart by cutting and rotating dart manipulation to reduce the spread of the vertical one. And Maddie of Madalynne told me to redraw dart legs to it points to bust point and ends about a 1/2 inch before it.

In the meantime I also emailed Sew Chic Patterns – and then I tried what Brooke suggested. But I didn’t really know what I was doing.

Beatrice Dress - bodice dart manipulation

And it still didn’t fit right. Then lo and behold, Laura of Sew Chic replied to my email over the weekend! How’s that for customer service? She told me I did not need a line to the side, all I needed to do was to cut through the dart to the apex and then from the apex to the shoulder seam and overlap closing the dart – and true the shoulder. And she even sent me a PDF with additional info. Oh, yay. So simple. So I did it.

Beatrice Dress pattern adjustment - SBA - csews.com

And it worked! Bagginess gone and it was so easy to do! Thank you Laura!

Beatrice bodice fits - csews.com

It took me three muslins to get to this point, meanwhile, it was the last week of May – and I hadn’t done any fitting of the skirt part of this fitted pattern. I also did a wide shoulder adjustment to the bodice. I have pretty broad shoulders. This means that the ease in Big Four patterns is perfect for my shoulders. Heheh. I used to wonder, what are folks talking about the ease being super huge on Big Four patterns? I haven’t had to adjust shoulders or arms on Big Four patterns. 😉

Next I attached the sleeves only to discover that the sleeve felt a little tight in the fleshy area between the bewb (spelling courtesy of Leila of Three Dresses) and the arm. Oh, dear – more pattern adjustments? Um, yeah, plus I haven’t been to the gym in five months so that area is fleshier than usual. (sigh)

Once again I asked for advice on IG and emailed Laura at Sew Chic again. I got advice from all but then decided I didn’t have enough time to do a good job. Time was running out so I had to switch gears and decided to go to the Anna Dress, which I thought I had a shot at completing because it wasn’t as fitted as Beatrice.  Anna has just four waist pleats in front, not darts, and two back darts at the waist. So I got started on Anna and discovered that the pleats went up too high, darn it!

Anna Dress bodice - needs an SBA - csews.com

Then I lowered the pleats about an inch and discovered that I needed to do an SBA – oh, noooooooo!!!

Anna Dress - bodice pleats lowered

It doesn’t look too bad in this photo but when I glanced at my profile from the side, uh, the bust area looked like a balloon with half the air taken out. Not. Good.

On to muslin no. 3! I took the SBA tip from Sew Chic’s Laura and applied it to the Anna bodice – slicing from the middle of the first two pleats to the apex of my bewb (you can kind of see the pink highlighter in that spot) and then from the apex all the way to the center of the shoulder seam line. I moved the pattern over 1/2 inch. I didn’t redraw the pleats because I didn’t know how/where I would do that and whether that would affect the matching of the front seams. The middle pleat seam lined up with one of the skirt seams. So I just left it where it was and crossed my fingers, hoping that I could ease my way into matching those seam lines.

Anna Dress pattern - SBA - csews.com

And it fit sooooo much better! Yay!

Anna Dress bodice - with SBA

I used a bed sheet from Goodwill to make that muslin. And now I was ready to cut my fashion fabric.

I got this unusual directional print at Britex Fabrics remnant sale a couple of years ago. It’s cotton with a touch of lycra and imported from Italy. The lighting isn’t so great on the photo but it’s 58 inches wide and the print goes from large size “squares” at the selvedges to small in the middle. The rectangular shapes are either black or charcoal grey and the lighter color squares in the middle are sort of beige.

Border print from Britex Fabrics

I only had a little over two yards so I thought of alternating the skirt panels with  charcoal grey or something. So I went back to Britex (lucky me, I work within walking distance so I could drop by during  lunch) and looked at some lightweight cotton solids but nothing was in the right shade of grey. The saleslady suggested we look at prints but nothing worked well with this busy print. Then she told me that they still had that fabric in stock.

“Really?” I asked. Well, getting more fabric seemed to be the best option. So I paid full price for two more yards (ahem – $39.95/yard ). I don’t usually spend that much on a single piece of fabric but I had a good feeling about it.

I decided to make Variation 2 with the V-neck,which seemed like a better fit with this directional print. And I decided to create my own length. I didn’t want a floor-length Anna because when I wear maxi skirts I tend to trip on the hem going up stairs. So I wanted more of a tea length – somewhere in between the knees and the ankles. A nontrippable length.

I just added 10 inches to the midi-length line on the skirt pattern pieces and drew a line there, which I called “CS length.” I traced out the maxi length in case I should change my mind and I just folded up the pattern at my CS length line and cut my skirt pieces out. I decided to lay my pieces out so that the smaller part of the print starts at the waist and then gets bigger at the bottom. This meant that I was placing my pattern pieces perpendicular to the grainline instead of parallel like you typically do.

The tricky part was deciding which way the print would go on the bodice pieces. The print is really large – about four inches wide, which I thought wouldn’t be too flattering across the shoulders. So I decided to go from large to small from my right side to the left. I also made sure that the pattern began shifting to the smallest squares past the center of the bodice. I’ve got the pattern piece here face down. This was so I could see where the right half would begin and end. The front bodice piece is cut on the fold so I wanted to choose exactly where that center fold would land. The bodice pieces were laid out on grain.

Anna Dress bodice fabric placement - csews.com

Then I began to sew the front pleats, which you iron on the wrong side so that the pleats are centered over the seam. To make it easier to do that I inserted a chopstick in pleat, which helped me center the fabric over the seam and then I ironed the pleats.

Inserting chopstick in pleat

For the back pieces, I had the larger part of the print on the same side as the front. I cut the two back bodice pieces separately. Below I’ve cut the left back side of the bodice and I’m placing the pattern piece for the right back side. I deliberately did not line up the right side. I moved the pattern piece about an inch higher than the bottom of the left bodice piece. Before I cut my fabric I had already decided that I wasn’t going to match anything at the seam lines on this fabric – not without driving myself completely bonkers anyway – so I wanted to be way off as opposed to slightly off, which would have made it look like I tried (and failed) to match the print.

By Hand London - Anna Dress - back bodice

And here’s what the completed back looks like at the waist – check out those matching seam lines! The center seam is my installed invisible zipper – everything lined up. Yay!

Anna Dress - back bodice seams - csews.com

And here’s the front – the two center pleats line up with the seam lines of the center skirt panel. I was a bit concerned that the SBA would affect the pleat placement. But when I pinned the bodice to the waist, I was able to ease the skirt so that the pleats lined up with center seam line. (Whew!)

Anna Dress front pleats - csews.com

And here are a few more view of the Anna Dress!

Back view of By Hand London - Anna Dress

And here are some more photos of the dress, which I really love. This is a very lightweight and drapey fabric. And it was really breezy today so in most of my photos the skirt is drifting in the breeze.

By Hand London - Anna Dress - csews.com

Oh, and a note on accessories. I’m wearing a vintage hat, which I got at a great boutique in Oakland called All Things Vintage. Nearly every time I got there I get a new hat! This one is made out of straw and velvet. The underside of the brim is black velvet as well as the hat band. I’m also wearing a vintage bracelet – it’s striped (black and ivory) and Bandolino pumps I got at DSW several weeks ago.

This photo was taken when the wind died down for two seconds. I think it’s one of the few photos where the skirt isn’t blowing against my legs. You can really see the drape of the fabric here.

By Hand London Anna Dress - border print fabric

The photos were all taken with my digital camera on a timer. Hey, I accidentally discovered the multiple shot feature in my camera earlier this year and now I use that along with the timer. So much easier!

By Hand London Anna Dress - border print fabric

Thank you for visiting! And don’t forget to visit Lilacs & Lace on Monday to vote for your favorite outfit in the Dressed to the Nines sewalong contest! You have until June 13 to cast your vote!

Anna Dress - Front view - csews.com

Everyday Dresses

Emery Dress and Red Velvet Dress Sewalongs

A few weeks ago I realized that I don’t have any everyday dresses in my wardrobe. Not one. I have everyday skirts but no everyday dresses. Yep. I’m more of a separates kinda gal so that’s part of the reason. And I guess the other reason is my attitude toward dresses. I guess I think of them as being something that you don’t wear everyday.

The five dresses I own only get worn a couple of times a year or not even that. They include a vintage black dress that I got years ago; the dress I wore as a bridesmaid to a wedding; two dresses I made from vintage Vogue patterns, and the dress I made for my BurdaStyle Sewing Vintage Modern contest entry earlier this year (I was a finalist but didn’t win). I usually end up wearing a vintage hat with these outfits and even a crinoline with the one I made for the sewing contest – not exactly everyday wear but I do wear them to work when I’m in the mood and the weather is warm enough in San Francisco.

So when I heard about Christine Haynes‘s Emery Dress and the Red Velvet Dress by Cake Patterns – I had to take a closer look. At first I thought the Emery Dress was a touch too girly for me – I think the bow made me hesitate. But then I saw the striped Emery Dress by Devon of Miss Make blog and it convinced me that I should get the pattern. She cut the collar on the bias and it looks fabulous, doesn’t it? She kindly let me repost this photo from her blog post Emery Dress Pattern.

Emery Dress - sewn by Devon of Miss Make - pattern by Christine Haynes

The Emery Dress Sewalong has just started but Christine is only on fabric and notions. Muslin sewing starts on Oct. 30. You can view the schedule here. I think you could still join in on it if you order the pattern right away. In November Christine will focus on bust adjustments – small and full. I’m looking forward to that!

The Red Velvet Sewalong starts on November 11! So there’s still time to participate.It’ll be a series of ten sessions over two weeks. I participated in the Cake Patterns Hummingbird Sewalong earlier this year, which was a lot of fun. So far I’ve made three Hummingbird tops, which you can see here.

Melizza of Pincushion Treats was a pattern tester for the Red Velvet sewing pattern. You can see two of the dresses she made here.

And I also love the Lady Skater Dress that Katie of Kadiddlehopper made. She wrote about it in Lady Skater: Sakura Blossom Style and graciously let me post this photo of her twirling around in the dress. Check out her post for more photos of this pretty dress.

Lady Skater Dress by Katie of Kadiddlehopper

And last but not least, today my copy of Clothing for Everyday: Stylish Dress Book by Yoshiko Tsukiori arrived! I pre-ordered it on Amazon.

Clothing for Everyday Wear: Stylish Dress Book by Toshiko Tsukiori

This is the English translation published by Laurence King. There are dresses, tops, jackets, and pants in this book – a total of 26 garments – according to the book flap. There are plenty of photos in the book – slender, winsome, and unsmiling  Japanese models, which probably means grading the pattern up a bit for me. The pattern is sized for XS, S, M, and L. No XL folks.

The dimensions for large are 36 5/8″ (93 cm) bust; 29 1/8″ (74 cm) waist, and 38 5/8″ (98 cm) hips. Based on that, I’m more of an XL in the hips and height. Oh, and the pattern gives the same height for all four sizes – 63″ (160 cm), which must be a mistake. 63″ is 5′ 3″. I’m nearly 5′ 8″ so who knows what the height measurement means.

I’m looking forward to adding everyday dresses to my wardrobe. Have you made any dresses that fall into the everyday category? What patterns have you liked? Have you  made anything from Japanese pattern books? What was your sizing experience like?

And do let me know if you’re participating in the Emery Dress Sewalong or the Red Velvet Sewalong. I’d love to see what your version looks like!

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