Lining the Sapporo Coat – a Papercut Patterns design

Hi, in my earlier post on my wool Sapporo Coat, I mentioned that I would be doing a follow-up post on lining the Sapporo Coat. So here it is!

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - lining - CSews.com

This is a Papercut Patterns design, which is available as a printed pattern ($30 NZD) and as a PDF. I bought my pattern at Stonemountain & Daughter Fabrics. There are just a few pattern pieces, the front and the back, which uses the same three pieces you use for the fashion fabric.

Here’s the lining cut and sewn. I used a very nice black warm coat lining from Britex Fabrics. It was flannel-backed on one side and a smooth and shiny satin on the other ($16/yard, 60 wide). The smooth side makes it easy for your coat to slide on and the flannel side makes it super easy to cut and sew. Britex calls this fabric “warm-back coat lining” and carries it in six colors, including brown, silver and royal blue ($15.99/yard).

Sapporo Coat lining, Papercut Patterns - CSews

The pattern calls for lining fabric that’s 60″ wide but you could use 44″ wide, just get another yard or so of fabric so you’ll have enough to cut all the lining pieces.

The Sapporo Coat lining is hand sewn to the sleeves and machine sewn along the front and the hem. You leave an opening in the side seam so you can turn it inside out. If you haven’t lined a coat before, it’s pretty basic. You place the right side of the lining so it’s facing the right side of your fashion fabric and then you sew them together and turn it inside out. It’s similar to making a pillow, just a different shape.

I pinned the lining to the facing, right sides together. I used a lot of quilting pins because longer pins are easier to work with the thick coat fabric.

Sapporo Coat lining pinned - CSews

Here’s a closer look.

Sapporo Coat lining, Papercut Patterns - CSews

Here’s the opening I left in the side seam. This is where I’ll turn the coat inside out.

Lining opening - Sapporo Coat - CSews

When you sew the facing, you stop 3/8 inch (1 cm) short of the hem because the corners of the coat will be sewn together last, which you’ll see below.

Next I pinned the coat hem to the lining and sewed this seam, beginning and ending 3/8 inch (1 cm) from each end.

Sapporo Coat lining hem - CSews

Here’s a close-up of the bottom hem pinned to the end. When you sew this seam, remember to stop 3/8 inch (1 cm) from the end.

Lining pinned to corner of Sapporo Coat - CSews

Here’s a look at the lining corner after I sewed the bottom hem.

Lining sewn to corner - Sapporo Coat - CSews

Then I sewed the diagonal seam and trimmed it so it would come to a point when I turned the Sapporo Coat lining inside out.

Sapporo Coat inside corner - CSews

The Sapporo Coat lining is now attached to the facing and hem and looks like this.

Lining attached - Sapporo Coat - CSews

Now the coat is ready to be turned inside out. So I pushed the right side of the coat through the opening in the lining.

Sapporo Coat lining - Papercut patterns - CSews

Now all that’s left is attaching the lining to the sleeves. This was the tedious part of lining the Sapporo Coat because you hand sew the sleeve lining to the sleeve. They are wide sleeves so it took a while.

Sleeve lining - Sapporo Coat - CSews

And voila! The coat was done!

Sapporo Coat - wool melton - front view- CSews

I love everything about this coat!

Lining the Sapporo Coat - Papercut Patterns - CSews

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat – my teal wool version

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - CSews

Hi! I finally took photos of my latest Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat! I made one version a couple of months ago. It was my mockup using a bed sheet, which you can see here. I made a mockup because I wanted to see how it fit before I made one from this luscious teal wool melton ($49.99/yard) I got from Britex Fabrics because I’m doing a guest post for Britex about this coat. This fabric is on sale for $39.99/yard until October 30! All their online wool fabrics are on sale until that date.

The instructions are clear and sewing the coat wasn’t difficult. Papercut Patterns rates its patterns with three skill levels – Rookie, Skilled and Expert. The Sapporo Coat is rated “Skilled,” which seems about right. You need to have some sewing experience to make this coat.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - lining - CSews.com

My lining fabric is also from Britex – it’s a lining specifically made for coats. This black warm-back coat lining is satin on one side and flannel on the other, which makes it easy to sew. It’s 60″ wide and $15.99/yard.

UPDATE: Here’s my post on lining the Sapporo Coat.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - back - CSews

I love the Sapporo Coat pattern and I especially love this beautiful fabric. I’ve never made anything in this color and I’ve never sewn wool melton before. The color is a deep teal. I was having trouble getting the right exposure and the sun was so bright it was hard to see the images. The color is more accurate in the photos that are darker.

I’m thrilled that it turn out so beautifully. The design of this coat works very well with this fabric. You can really see the cocoon shape. It’s not a dramatic cocoon but more of a gradual tapering towards the bottom.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat

Sapporo Coat pattern details

This coat comes in three sizes – XXS/XS, S/M and L/XL. You can get the paper pattern here for $30 NZD or the PDF here for $20 NZD. This is a coat has a lot of ease. I made the largest size because I have very broad shoulders and very long arms so this size was perfect.

I’m not joking about the broad shoulders. You know how people complain that Vogue patterns are huge in the shoulders? Well, those shoulders are fine for me. So far, I haven’t needed to make any adjustments in the shoulders for the Vogue patterns I’ve made. The teal is like the color in this photo and the one below it.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - CSews

I’m about 5′ 7 1/2″ tall – though I like saying 5′ 8″ (172 cm). The coat hem is above my knees but a little below mid-thigh. So anyone shorter than 5′ 7″ should definitely measure the pattern and see where the hem will land on your body. You may need to shorted the pattern.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat

Sapporo Coat size

For some people, the size they initially made was huge on them so I highly recommend making a mockup before sewing your fashion fabric. Also, if you are not very tall, you will likely need to shorten the sleeves. You can shorten the sleeves by removing length from the shoulder of the top front pattern piece and the back. Then you can leave the cuffs as is.

I didn’t make any changes to the coat pattern except for lengthening the pockets. I added an inch of depth because the pockets seemed a little shallow for me. I have long fingers and I really want to get my hand in there.

Sapporo Coat pockets

The coat front is made up of two pattern pieces. The seam where the pieces come together include the pocket. So when I added depth to the top pattern piece here…

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat

I also needed to add the same amount to the bottom pattern piece. To make sure they matched, I lined up the pattern pieces. The top pattern piece is folded down…

Sapporo Coat - pocket lengthened - CSews

… and forms the top of the pocket, which you can see here. The pockets are formed by the fashion fabric, which may seem a little odd because pockets usually use lining fabric. I suppose if your fabric was really thick, you could use fashion fabric for 1/3 of the pocket and then lining for the rest.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat

Here’s what it looks like on the wrong side. I clipped the seam where it curves.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat

The front pattern pieces have opposing curves, which means careful sewing. I used a lot of pins, sewed slowly and it looks great. This fabric was easy to sew.

Sapporo Coat - pockets - CSews

I LOVE the pockets!

Cutting and sewing wool melton

This was my first time sewing wool melton, which is a twill weave that has been felted and has a nap. When you pet it, you can feel the direction of the nap. It’s smooth when you stroke in one direction, and slightly rough in the opposite direction. Remember seeing the words “with nap” and “without nap” on the back of a pattern? Well, when you have a fabric with nap, you need to pay attention to the direction of the nap.

I noted the direction of the nap in my Chaco liner.

Wool melton - direction of nap - CSews

If you cut your pattern pieces and the nap is is not all facing in the same direction, the fabric pieces will look different when you sew them together. One piece may seem slightly darker than the other because of the nap.

Luckily, the layout Papercut Patterns provides for the Sapporo coat is laid out in the direction of the nap. I laid out my pattern pieces so that when you stroke the fabric up, that’s the smooth side. I laid it out that way because when you sit down, you will be stroking the fabric up. It’s better for the fabric to be stoked in the same direction.

I also consulted Sandra Betzina’s More Fabric Savvy book for advice on sewing wool melton. Her indispensable fabric guide has been updated this year. The latest edition is called All New Fabric Savvy (Amazon affiliate link here). It’s worth every penny. I bought the new version, too. She tells you facts about fabrics, how to treat it before you sew it, what size needle to use and the type of thread that’s best for the fabric and much more.

Sandra recommends using a 90/14 needle, which I did and she also says to use silk thread because it “makes seams almost invisible.” Well, I didn’t want my seams to disappear so I just used Guttmacher polyester thread. She also advises using a Teflon presser foot. I didn’t have one so I got a snap-on version at Stonemountain & Daughter Fabrics, which is also where I bought my paper pattern. The Teflon foot looks like this.

Teflon foot for sewing wool melton fabric - CSews

Yep, it’s plastic. I’ve associated Teflon with metal because it’s used to make nonstick pans for cooking and baking so I didn’t expect it to look like this. But Teflon can be used to coat plastic as well. (Read about the six basic types of Teflon coatings on Chemours website.)

Sandra also recommended preshrinking the fabric by holding a steam iron above the fabric. I steamed it. You could also take it to a dry cleaner and have them steam it, which is what Douglas, the dapper sales associate at Britex, suggests.

I traced my pattern pieces using a Chaco liner. The pattern piece provided for the center back is half a pattern piece – like it’s supposed to be cut on the fold, except you don’t. I think to squeeze all the pattern pieces on two sheets, they had to slice it in half. So when I laid that piece out, I marked the “fold line” on the fabric with a few white lines. The I could line up the pattern piece with those marks and trace the other side. I used my Kai scissors to cut the fabric.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - CSews

Sapporo Coat and interfacing

The pattern calls for interfacing along the front facing and bottom hem, which makes sense for lighter fabric or fabric that has a lot of drape to it. But melton is thick and Sandra Betzina says you don’t need interfacing for wool melton because it has a lot of body already. But she does say to stabilize the neck and shoulder with stay tape. So I fused some stay tape along the shoulder seam.

Sapporo Coat - wool melton - stay tape on shoulder seam - CSews

Sewing the cuffs

Each cuff is made of two pieces of fashion fabric. First you sew the side seam to form one side of the cuff and then you put one inside the other right sides together and sew the bottom edge.

Sapporo Coat cuff - wool melton - CSews

This is a rather thick seam as you can see so I trimmed down the seam allowances to try to reduce the bulk.

Sapporo Coat - cuff - CSews

Then I understitched the cuffs.

Sapporo Coat cuff - understitched - CSews

Because the fabric is so thick understitching made one side of the cuff slightly longer than the other side. I tried to press the fabric so the seam was exactly in the middle but it didn’t quite work. I basted the cuffs together at the top as instructed before I attached them to the shoulders.

Attaching the cuffs was the only part of this coat that gave me a little trouble because the cuff pieces didn’t want to line up. I used quilting pins on this fabric. I had to hold it in place as I slowly removed the pins as I sewed the cuffs.

Sapporo Coat - cuff pinned - CSews

Here’s another look at the completed cuff.

Sapporo Coat - sleeve - CSews

Here’s that the coat looks like from the wrong side – before the lining is attached.

Sapporo Coat - wrong side - CSews

The back of the coat

The back of this coat is made of three pieces – one large center piece flanked by two triangular pieces. I love the seams on this coat!

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - back - CSews

And here’s another view of the back, which gives you an idea of how roomy the coat is.

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - back view - CSews

The one drawback

I really love this coat but the one drawback is that it looks best with skinny pants or leggings. I had to wear these leggings because I don’t have any skinny jeans or narrow pants. I guess I need to make some now! Otherwise I need to come up with other outfits to wear with leggings.

In these photos I’m wearing the Draped Mini Dress, which I made from the Japanese sewing book She Wears the Pants (blogged here). I usually wear it as a tunic with pants but I decided to pair it with leggings because I didn’t have anything else to wear with the coat.

This post got really long so I’ll be writing a follow-up post about the lining. Stay tuned! Meanwhile, here’s one last image of the coat for you to enjoy. Also, I’d love to know if you’ve made a coat and what that experience was like for you.

Sapporo Coat - wool melton - front view- CSews

Happy sewing!

Papercut Patterns - Sapporo Coat - in a teal wool melton from Britex Fabrics - by CSews

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat – mockup version

Hi, it’s been a while since my last post. I’ve been sewing but I’ve had little time to blog. I even had a paying sewing gig at a startup last week but I can’t say much about it because I signed an NDA. Anyway I attached my iPhone to a tripod mount and took these photos of my mockup of the Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat.

It was late afternoon so the sun was not at its brightest and by that time, it’s shining through a tree – giving this natural dappled light effect. It’s not a special filter or Photoshop effect.;)

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - side view - C Sews

I made this mockup using a bed sheet I got at a thrift store for a few dollars. I wanted to see how it would fit before I made one in a luscious wool coating from Britex Fabrics. The Sapporo Coat, part of Papercut Patterns Sakura collection, comes in three sizes – XXS/XS, S/M and L/XL. I made the largest size. I have broad shoulders and long arms. I didn’t make any pattern adjustments and it fit quite well. Note: The sleeves may be too long for some people.

You can get the pattern here on Papercut Patterns website or you may be able to get a copy in your country. (You can go to this link to see if a store near you carries this New Zealand-based indie line of patterns.)

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - side view - C Sews

As you can see the Sapporo Coat is roomy with wide sleeves and a slight cocoon shape. It tapers – getting slightly more narrow at the hem. The cocoon shape did give me pause but I decided to try it and see if I’d like it – and I do like it.

There aren’t too many pattern pieces for this design – top and bottom front, back neck facing, three pieces for the back and the sleeve cuff, which is made by cutting four of the same pattern piece. There’s also the lining pieces. The pattern also calls for interfacing for the front edge, back neck and bottom hem.

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - C Sews

The only tricky part of constructing this coat was the corner of the bottom hem and the lining. In this photo, I’ve attached the lining to the front edge of the coat. You can see the strip of interfacing fused to the front facing, which is not a separate pattern piece. It’s formed by folding the front edge.

Sapporo Coat - lining detail - C Sews

The tricky part for me was that I didn’t quite understand how to attach the bottom hem until I realized that I needed to line up the side seams.

Sapporo Coat - attaching lining - C Sews

Then all I needed to do was fold up the bottom hem and sew the coat fabric to the lining fabric right sides together. My lining is just some cheap cotton/poly blend I got for a few dollars.

When you attach the lining to the front and bottom, you stop sewing 1 cm from the end.

Sapporo Coat - inside corner - C Sews

Stopping before you get to the edge, lets you sew this diagonal seam.

Sapporo coat - construction detail - C Sews

I was wasn’t precise in my stitching was I was a little short on the bottom hem. But this is just my mockup so I left it as is.

You leave an opening on one side seam of the lining so you can turn the coat inside out.

Sapporo Coat - opening to turn coat inside out - C Sews

And then the bottom inside corner looks like this.

Sapporo Coat - inside detail - C Sews

Here’s the back view of the Sapporo Coat. You can see the large center piece and two smaller pieces to the left and right. It would be fun to do a version with piping at the seam lines of this coat.

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - C Sews

The large cuff attaches to the front top piece and the back shoulder piece.

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - sleeve detail - C Sews

I really like the pockets on the Sapporo Coat. However, if you use a lightweight fabric or a fabric with drape, the pocket might sag slightly because there is no interfacing there. The top edge of this pocket is formed by a fold in the fabric. You might want to consider putting some interfacing there if you are using a lightweight fabric. The beauty of this pattern is that it works for all fabrics.

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - front detail - C Sews mockup

I like the diagonal lines formed by the front seams and the pockets of the Sapporo Coat.

Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat - front detail - C Sews

This Sapporo Coat is going to be my fancy bath robe – a great idea from Brooke of Custom Style. We follow each other on Instagram and when I posted an early photo of this on my IG feed (@csews), she(@sewbrooke) made that suggestion. Thanks, Brooke!

I’m wearing a vintage hat that has a little veil attached to the brim. My husband doesn’t like this hat. He thinks it’s an odd hat and doesn’t get that it’s a “sitting” hat, a hat meant to perch on your head as opposed to fitting around your entire head. Well, I like it and I’ll continue wearing it!

Vintage hat with veil - C Sews

Stay tuned for my wool coating version of the Papercut Patterns Sapporo Coat!

Sapporo Coat - Papercut Patterns, Sakura collection 2017 - C Sews