My Frocktails skirt – finished

Hi, I finished my Frocktails skirt in February to wear at the Bay Area Sewists Frocktails event earlier this year. I finished it just a few hours before the event began. It began as my Sew Frosting project but I didn’t finish it in November and then I thought of it as my #SewHappyColor project. However, I didn’t take photos in time to post it during the Reds and Pinks week of that Instagram challenge hosted by Katie Kortman. Ultimately, I consider it my Frocktails skirt.

Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists event using Marimekko fabric - CSews.com

I wrote a WIP post in February about sewing the pleats and attaching the ribbons. For this skirt, I used three different fabrics – the main fabric is the Marimekko print. I had 1 1/3 yards (~1.2 meters) of the Marimekko fabric, which was 58 inches wide (147 cm). I wanted to use all of it for a nice full skirt.

Side note: When I did a search on my blog for “Marimekko,I discovered that I blogged about this Marimekko fabric in 2013, the year I bought it. I wondered how long I’d had this fabic.)

Colorful skirt using Marimekko "Tultakero" fabric  - right view of skirt, hand in pocket - CSews.com

Because I didn’t have enough for a midi length – my favorite length – I color-blocked the skirt – adding a red panel at the top and a deep violet panel at the bottom. The pleats are in the red panel. If you look closely, you can see the topstitching on the Marimekko fabric in the photo below.

Inverted pleat detail in color-blocked skirt using Marimekko "Tultakero" fabric -  CSews.com

I first thought about making the skirt back in December when I blogged about my Sew Frosting plans. It took my a long time to figure out the pleats – how deep to make them to use all the fabric, how far apart to place the pleats, and how much space to put between the two front pleats for an adjustable waist.

The deep violet panel at the bottom is a quilting cotton I got at Stonemountain & Daughter Fabrics. I brought the Marimekko fabric with me to find a fabric for the bottom panel. It’s a nearly perfect match for the color in the print.

Detail of color-blocked skirt hem -  print - Marimekko "Tultakero" - quilting fabric for the topstitched bottom - CSews.com

I topstitched the violet panel. This is a machine-washable skirt and topstitching will make it easier to press.

Color-blocked skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails -  Marimekko "Tultakero" fabric -  CSews.com

When I wore the skirt to Frocktails, I realized that the ribbons weren’t staying tied and it was gaping in the back. I thought the Petersham ribbon would stay tied. Plus, the red fabric was a stretch cotton, which didn’t work well for that part of the skirt. I used that red fabric because it was in my stash and it matched the Marimekko fabric. I was attempting to sew my stash.

To solve my problem, I added a hook to one ribbon …

Adjustable waist of colorful skirt - hook attached to Petersham ribbon - CSews.com

… and an eye on the other side to ensure that the skirt would stay together. Here’s what it looks like when it’s hooked together.

Skirt hook and eye attached at waist - CSews.com

Here’s what it looks like when I unhook it.

Skirt detail - unhooked at the waist - CSews.com

I got the Petersham ribbon from Britex Fabrics. The ribbon was also in my stash and perfectly matched the trees in the print.

Inside the Frocktails skirt

I lined the skirt with a soft cotton rayon from Britex that complemented the print. I drafted a facing and attached the lining to the facing. Here’s an inside view of the skirt waist.

Inside view of skirt facing and lining  - CSews.com

The skirt has horsehair braid at the hem, giving the skirt a nice fullness without the need of wearing any petticoats or tulle.

Inside view of hem and horsehair braid - CSews.com

More views of my Frocktail skirt

Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - holding out ribbon ends - CSews.com
Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - CSews.com
Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - view of left side - CSews.com
Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - 3/4 view of back - CSews.com
Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - back view - CSews.com
Frocktails skirt for Bay Area Sewists Frocktails - right view - CSews.com

I’m really happy with how the skirt turned out. I think it could use a bit more support at the waist – maybe I’ll add a stiffer interfacing – but I like the length and the colors.

Do you hold on to fabric for years before you sew it? Or do you sew your fabric right away? I’d love to know!

Update: Here are a few photos from the Bay Area Sewists Frocktails event. You can see more photos on the Meetup page.

Frocktails photo on the stairs at Tupper & Reed in Berkeley - CSews.com
Beth, me, Tee and Pauline on the steps of Tupper & Reed, where we held Frocktails 2019

WIP Frocktails skirt with Marimekko fabric

My Frocktails skirt is slowly coming together. I haven’t worked on it very much over the past few weeks and now I’ve got to finish it by Saturday – when the Bay Area Sewists Frocktails in February event is happening.

This was my #SewFrosting project that I started in January. I sewed the pleats in the back about a month ago. Here’s what the back initially looked like when I basted the pleats. You can see bits of white thread that I used.

WIP Frocktails Skirt - Marimekko fabric - back inverted box pleats - CSews.com

But I decided not to sew all the way down the red fabric. Instead I sewed about 2/3 of the way down and the back now looks like this.

Frocktails skirt - inverted box pleats on the back- CSews.com

I pinned the ribbons in place to see how it would look and then realized that the Petersham ribbon is a bit stiff and quite wide (2 inches, ~7.5 cm), it would be hard to bring the two sides close together. I chose Petersham ribbon because when I tied it, it would stay tied. The problem with a satin ribbon is that it’s rather slippery.

Ribbon tie for Frocktails skirt - Marimekko fabric - CSews.com

So I decided to fold the ribbon in thirds and then sew it to the top piece. Before I sewed the pleats with the ribbon ends inside, I fused some interfacing on the wrong side of the fabric to give it some extra support.

Frocktails skirt - ribbon at waist - CSews.com

It took me a long time to figure out how I wanted to place the pleats in the front. I needed to have some extra fabric for an adjustable waist – but not too much fabric or the waist would be too loose. (See my Chardon Skirt with adjustable waist.) So I played around with how deep those last two center pleats would be and how far apart to place them. I finally put them about 8.5 inches (~21.5 cm) apart.

Frocktails skirt - ribbon at waist sewn into inverted box pleats - CSews.com

I don’t have a dress form so I spent some time looking at different placements in front of my bathroom mirror. I mostly make garments from existing sewing patterns so I really didn’t need a dress form. Plus I don’t have space in my apartment to store a dress form.

However, this is a skirt that I’ve drafted and it would have been helpful to play arond with the pleats on a dress form.

I decided at the last minute to have a facing because I want the top of the skirt to have some body and it will also look more tidy on the inside. So I drafted a facing over the weekend and I’ll attach some lining to it. The box pleats are rather deep and I’d like to cover them up.

Here’s what’s left to do:

  • buy lining fabric (red? purple?)
  • attach lining fabric to facing
  • sew facing/lining to skirt
  • decide on whether to add an invisible zipper to the side
  • hem the lining
  • hem the skirt

If I can do a little bit every day I should be able to finish this by Saturday. How long does it usually take you to finish a project? I feel like this WIP Frocktails skirt is taking forever.

I also promised my husband I would help fix a sweater of his. I’m hand sewing suede elbow patches to a favorite sweater. I finished one patch yesterday – one more to go!